Highlights from the 2018 Festival

We came together at Sydney Writers' Festival to celebrate and witness the power of storytelling. At Tuesday night's Opening Address Artistic Director Michaela McGuire opened the Festival by quoting Margaret Atwood: "A word, after a word, after a word is Power." 

We witnessed that power first-hand over the week in real time. Here, Michaela shares a few poignant moments from the 2018 Festival...

 

Helen Garner, acting out a faith healing on Matthew Condon, throwing her arms in the air – poised for a perfect moment as our own, personal Jesus – before crawling across the City Recital Hall stage.

 

Kari Gislason and Richard Fidler finishing their Sagaland session by singing an Icelandic lullaby together. 

 

Linda Burney and Anne Aly talking about repeatedly being mistaken for each other, before performing an a capella duet of Kesha side by side.

 

Marcia Langton asking, “What was the French philosopher who wrote about the noble savage?” and three-quarters of the crowd yelling in unison, “Rosseau!”

 

The first audience question in Ben Taub and Ben Doherty’s session on Covering a Crisis coming from Peter Greste.

 

Min Jin Lee staging photoshoots all across the Festival, and hugging any staff member who encountered her.

 

James Rebanks, the Hardwick Shepherd who was a guest of the Festival two years ago, Tweeting us a photo of his young son’s three baby sheep. He named the first one ‘Sydney’, the second one ‘Harbour’, and the third one ‘Bridge’. Apparently, the family trip to the Festival made quite the impression.

 

Annabel Crabb, Leigh Sales, Richard Fidler and Julia Zemiro generously, wonderfully, revealing Tim Minchin as their surprise guest.

 

Aminatou Sow remarking in ‘Women in Tech’ that “girls need to build things.” A father, one of our Live and Local audience members from across the country, tweeted in response: “Women in tech is challenging me as a parent to think about the choices I make for my daughters.”

 

A word after a word after a word is Power, and that power is profound.