Maxine Beneba Clarke never imagined that her childhood on the rural fringe of Sydney would become fodder for her bestselling memoir. The interest that her story received strengthened her belief that if you look closely, you can find art in everyday life. Join the award-winning The Hate Race and Foreign Soil author as she examines why commonplace happenings are just as valuable sources of creative inspiration as the epic themes that often underpin the canon of Western literature and art.

Maxine Beneba Clarke (Australian)

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Maxine Beneba Clarke is the author of 8 books, including the Indie and ABIA Award winning short fiction collection Foreign Soil, the bestselling memoir The Hate Race, the Premier's Award winning poetry collection Carrying The World, and the CBCA winning picture book The Patchwork Bike. She is the editor of Best Australian Stories 2017, and Growing Up African in Australia.

Jadey O’Regan (Australian)

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Dr Jadey O'Regan facilitates the Bachelor of Music (Contemporary Music Practice) program at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music at the University of Sydney. In 2014, she was awarded her PhD titled When I Grow Up: The Development of the Beach Boys' Sound, which analysed the development of the distinctive sound of the Beach Boys between 1962 and 1966. Her research has been published in the book Good Vibrations: Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys in Critical Perspective (Ed. Philip Lambert) and research has been presented both in Australia and internationally. Her research interests include the musical analysis of pop music, pop hooks, empirical musicology and music in the 1990s. She is also an established musician and songwriter, and a performing session musician across a variety of genres.