The Indigenous peoples of Australia had many methods of managing the harsh climate. In his novel Dark Emu, Bruce Pascoe explores pre-colonial agricultural practices with new insight. Climate Scientist Tim Flannery joins Bruce to discuss early forms of land management as described in the records and diaries of Colonial explorers. They will also consider what we can learn from these practices today.

Related links: Science, History, Ancient Australia, Geography, Agriculture

Supported by NSW Education Standards Authority.

 

Bruce Pascoe (Australian)

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Bruce Pascoe is a Bunurong, Tasmanian and Yuin man. He is a member of Yuin Gurandgi, past secretary of Bidwell-Maapand has been the director of the Australian Studies Project for the Commonwealth Schools Commission. Bruce has had a varied career as a teacher, farmer, fisherman, barman, fencing contractor, lecturer, Aboriginal language researcher, archaeological site worker and editor. His book Fog A Dox, won the Young Adult category of the 2013 Prime Minister's Literary Awards. Dark Emu won the NSW Premier’s Award Book of the Year in 2016.

Tim Flannery (Australian)

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Tim Flannery is one of the world’s most prominent environmentalists and a former Australian of the Year. In 2011 he was made a Chevalier of the Order of St Charles, and in 2015 received the Jack Blayney Award for Dialog from Simon Fraser University, Canada. In 2013 he founded, and is now chief councillor, of the Australian Climate Council, Australia’s largest and most successful crowdfunded organisation. He is currently a professor at Melbourne University Sustainability Institute.

Tim has published over 140 peer-reviewed scientific papers and has named 25 living and 50 fossil mammal species. His 32 books include the award winning The Future Eaters and The Weather Makers, which has been translated into over 20 languages. He has made numerous documentaries and regularly writes for the New York Review of Books. He speaks Bahasa Indonesian and Melanesian Pigeon, and has over 20 years of experience as an explorer and biologist in New Guinea and surrounding countries, and has extensive knowledge of the region. His most recent book, which deals with carbon negative technologies, is Atmosphere of Hope: Searching for Solutions to the Climate Crisis

Jamila Rizvi (Australian)

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Jamila is a writer, presenter and commentator. She writes a weekly political column for News Limited and appears regularly on Channel 10, ABC and SBS. She was previously editor-in-chief of the Mamamia Women's Network and prior to entering the media, she worked for the Rudd and Gillard Governments. Jamila's first book is Not Just Lucky, a career manifesto for millennial women. It will be published in 2017.