In a time of eco-crisis and its denial, experts consider the fundamentals: food and water. What are the implications of the life within our oceans disappearing? What happens when water is both life-giving and potentially devastating? Tess Lea talks to authors Chin Jou (Supersizing America: How Inner Cities Got Fast Food with Government Help), Astrida Neimanis (co-author of Thinking with Water), Elspeth Probyn (Eating the Ocean) and Beth Yahp (Eat First, Talk Later) about our complex relationships with the things that give us life.

Supported by the University of Sydney

Beth Yahp (Australian)

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Beth Yahp is an author, editor and writing teacher who lectures in the creative writing program at the University of Sydney. Her fictional memoir Eat First, Talk Later was published in 2015 and her collection of stories The Red Pearl and Other Stories is forthcoming with Vagabond Press in 2017, along with a re-issue of her award-winning novel The Crocodile Fury.

Astrida Niemanis (Australian)

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Astrida Neimanis is a Lecturer in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney. She is author of Bodies of Water: Posthuman Feminist Phenomenology and co-editor of Thinking with Water, both of which seek to diagnose and reimagine our human relationship to water. Astrida is also associate editor of the journal Environmental Humanities, co-convenor of the Composting: Feminisms and the Environmental Humanities research group, and key researcher with the Sydney Environment Institute.

Elspeth Probyn (Australian)

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Elspeth Probyn is a professor of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney. Elspeth is the author of several ground-breaking books including Sexing the Self, Outside Belongings, Carnal Appetites, and Blush: Faces of Shame. Her recent book, Eating the Ocean, was hailed in The Times Higher Education as 'one of the most profound works ... on the sea, and the issues with which it presents us.'

Chin Jou (Australian)

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Chin Jou is a lecturer in American history at the University of Sydney. She is the author of Supersizing Urban America: How Inner Cities Got Fast Food with Government Help. She is currently researching prison food in the United States.

Tess Lea (Australian)

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Tess Lea is chair of the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney. She is an anthropologist who specialises in the ethnography of settler colonial organisations and policy. Her work spans human-other relations, Indigenous social policy and the anthropology of infrastructure.