Fifty years after the 1967 referendum, works by First Nations writers continue to play a key role in activism and change in Australia. Evelyn Araluen, Hannah Donnelly, Nayuka Gorrie and Alison Whittaker are part of the next wave of First Nations women writers. In a not-to-be-missed event, these writers talk about community and courage, including a ‘live lit response’ honouring the matriarchal writers who have shaped their journeys. Hosted by guest curator Ellen van Neerven.

Supported by The Copyright Agency   

Curated by Ellen van Neervan. 

Nayuka Gorrie (Australian)

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Nayuka Gorrie is a Gunai/Kurnai, Gunditjmara, Wiradjuri and Yorta Yorta writer. Nayuka writes social commentary and television comedy.

Evelyn Araluen (Australian)

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Evelyn Araluen is a poet, educator and researcher working with Indigenous literatures at the University of Sydney. Her work has won the Nakata Brophy Prize for Young Indigenous Writers, the Judith Wright Poetry Prize, and a Wheeler Centre Next Chapter Fellowship. Born, raised, and writing in Dharug country, she is a Bundjalung descendant.

Alison Whittaker (Australian)

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Alison Whittaker is a Gomeroi poet, essayist and legal scholar. She is a Research Fellow at the Jumbunna Institute. In 2017-2018 Alison was a Fulbright scholar at Harvard Law School where she was named Dean’s Scholar in Race, Gender and Criminal Law. Her second book Blakwork is a collection of poetry, essays and short stories.