The scientific method is designed to be objective. So what happens when you take science personally? Ashley Hay talks to author James Bradley (The Silent Invasion), neurosurgeon Henry Marsh (Do No Harm), author Bianca Nogrady (The End: The Human Experience of Death) and The Guardian Australia environment reporter Michael Slezak. They discuss how journalists can report dispassionately on the disturbing effects of climate change, how surgeons bear the burden of human error and how novelists can translate science for wider audiences. 

Michael Slezak (Australian)

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Michael Slezak is the National Science, Technology and Environment Reporter for the ABC. He edited Best Australian Science Writing 2017, and contributed to a number of earlier editions of the anthology. Prior to joining The Guardian, Michael was the Australian correspondent for New Scientist magazine. He has won several awards for his journalism, including Article of the Year at the Publishers' Australia awards, and the United Nations Association of Australia Award for Climate Reporting.

Ashley Hay (Australian)

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Ashley Hay's latest novel is A Hundred Small Lessons. Her earlier work has won accolades in Australia and abroad, most recently the 2016 Bragg UNSW Press Prize for Science Writing. She has been longlisted for awards including the Miles Franklin and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and shortlisted for awards including the Commonwealth Writers' Prize and the Kibble. Her previous novel, The Railwayman's Wife, received the Foundation for Australian Literary Studies' Colin Roderick Award, and People's Choice at the NSW Premier's Literary Awards. It was published in the UK, the US and in translation.