The Indigenous peoples of Australia had many methods of managing the harsh climate. In his novel Dark Emu, Bruce Pascoe explores pre-colonial agricultural practices with new insight. Climate Scientist Tim Flannery joins Bruce to discuss early forms of land management as described in the records and diaries of Colonial explorers. They will also consider what we can learn from these practices today.

Related links: Science, History, Ancient Australia, Geography, Agriculture

Supported by NSW Education Standards Authority.

Bruce Pascoe (Australian)

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Bruce Pascoe is an Australian Indigenous writer and a Yuin, Bunurong and Tasmanian man. Bruce has worked in education, publishing, farming, fishing and Aboriginal language retrieval. He published and edited Australian Short Stories quarterly magazine for 16 years, and was joint winner (with David Foster) of Australian Literature Award in 1999 and winner of the Radio National Short Story Competition in 1998. His most recent non-fiction title, Dark Emu, challenges the claim that pre-colonial Australian Aboriginal peoples were hunter-gatherers. Dark Emu was shortlisted for the 2014 Victorian Premier's Indigenous Writer's Award and QLD Literary Award; and won the NSW Premier's Book of the Year and Indigenous Writer's Prize in 2016. It will be presented by Bangarra Dance Company in 2018. His teenage novel, Fog a Dox, won the Prime Minister’s Young Adult Literature Award in 2013. 

Jamila Rizvi (Australian)

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Jamila is a writer, presenter and commentator. She writes a weekly political column for News Limited and appears regularly on Channel 10, ABC and SBS. She was previously Editor-in-Chief of the Mamamia Women's Network and prior to entering the media, she worked for the Rudd and Gillard Governments. Jamila's first book is Not Just Lucky, a career manifesto for millennial women.